THE GREAT LAKES FIBER SHOW

WORKSHOPS

WORKSHOPS

The Great Lakes Fiber Show offers a range of workshops for almost every interest and skill level. Registration opens March 1 and closes May 10, filling on a first-come-first-served basis. Late registrations may be accepted if space is available at an additional late fee of $10 per class.  Please contact us by calling or emailing us.

Half-day workshops: $45 • Full-day workshops: $80
Material fees, where applicable, must be paid in cash directly to the instructor

SATURDAY, 8:30–11:30am

Getting to Know Your Angora Rabbit

If you’re thinking about getting an Angora rabbit or you already have one, this workshop is for you. Using a hand-on approach you will learn about angora care, housing, and basic grooming. In this workshop you will learn how to handle your bunny (yes, you are the boss), cut nails, groom, and ask any other questions you might have.

Instructor: Colleen Boyd • Skill Level: Beginner

MATERIALS FEE: $20
includes grooming box filled with equipment needed to make your bunny ownership a wonderful experience and the class booklet.

BRING TO CLASS

  • An Angora rabbit (if you do not own a rabbit, email instructor well in advance of class)
  • Current grooming tools
  • Sample-sized carpet (approx. 17” x 13”)
  • Long-sleeved shirt & long pants or apron

INSTRUCTOR
Colleen Boyd began her journey as a fiber artist 32 years ago. A spinner, dyer, and weaver, she is now an Angora rabbit breeder and has been working on colors in the Giant Angora breed category. She teaches regularly at fiber festivals all over Michigan.

Tuck Into Brioche Knitting

Brioche stitch is a reversible pattern that creates a thick, lofty, stretchy fabric that appears similar to a 1×1 rib. It’s a great choice for hats, scarves, blankets, sweaters and more! Many top designers love brioche (pronounced bee-oh-sh) and are designing many popular garments using the technique. Come learn both one and two color basic Brioche knitting.

Instructor: Bonnie Harden • Skill Level: Beginner and up

MATERIALS FEE: None

BRING TO CLASS

  • Worsted or bulky weight yarn
  • 24” circular needles in a size to match the yarn

INSTRUCTOR
Bonnie is an avid knitter who has been teaching classes at The Artful Yarn, in Chagrin Falls, Ohio for many years.

Variations on Long Draw

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“Long draw” spinning techniques are often used to create “woolen” yarns – yarns that are,  lofty, soft and warm!  We will cover three variations of long draw using commercially-prepared rovings, drum carded batts, and hand carded rolags.  We will create samples of thick, lopi-style singles yarns, as well as thinner, plied woolen yarns.  In the process, we will discuss the types of fiber that work best for different long draw techniques, how to create a hand carded rolag, and how best to use woolen yarns.

Instructor: Amy Tyler • Skill Level: Intermediate (spinning)

MATERIALS FEE: $15
Includes fibers for carding and spinning, notebook with handouts, sundry supplies, samples for examination

BRING TO CLASS

  • Spinning wheel in good working order
  • Three bobbins
  • Lazy kate
  • Hand cards

INSTRUCTOR
Amy was first a dancer, then a neuroscientist and professor. In 2004 she left the academic world behind to pursue fiber arts full time. Since then she had taught spinning and knitting workshops at venues across the country and is known for her animated and engaging teaching style. Her fiber work is informed by her art and science background; she has a keen understanding of learning movement skills, composition, pattern recognition, and systematic exploration. The result is her focus on spinning and knitting technique, texture, three-dimensional structure, and knit designs that exploit handspinning techniques. She is the author of Spin-Off magazine’s column. “Ask a Spinning Teacher”. You can find additional articles by Amy in Spin-Off and Ply Magazine.

SATURDAY, 12:30–3:30pm

Needle Felting Sculpture Basics

Needle Felted GnomesIn this class, participants will make a gnome or small figure to learn the basic forms and skills that can be used to make all sorts of sculptures out of wool: animals, people, freeform, flowers, etc.  No wire framework — just wool. Additional items may be made after the first sculpture is completed, if time allows. Needle felting offer a great craft for holiday decorations, gifts, and just fun for your imagination. Because participants will be using sharp felting needles, no children will be permitted to register or participate.

Instructor: Gina Talandis • Skill Level: Beginner (only adults, 18 or over)

MATERIALS FEE: $25
Includes a set of felting needles, container, foam work pad, assorted felting aids, an array of colors and types of felting wool and embellishments to choose from. Each student will receive a tool kit to take home containing all the tools needed to do basic needle felting sculpture, along with a list of suggestions and links for purchasing additional supplies.

BRING TO CLASS

  • Sharp small scissors

INSTRUCTOR
Gina began weaving over 20 years ago and has taken up spinning in the past year. She started needle felting for fun about 3 years ago.

Variegated Yarns on Your Rigid Heddle Loom

That colorful yarn that caught your eye — now, what to do with it? Join us as we look at different types of variegated and multi-colored yarns, then explore ways to use those yarns on your rigid heddle loom. Participants will warp their looms to be ready to weave.

Instructor: Stephen Page • Skill Level: Novice weavers
Weavers should have completed at least one or two projects

MATERIALS FEE: $5
Includes handouts

BRING TO CLASS

  • Rigid Heddle loom
  • Heddles you have on hand
  • Warping peg
  • A few balls or cones of variegated yarns from your stash

NOTE: Additional details will be provided after registration

INSTRUCTOR
Stephen Page has been weaving for the last ten years. After being inspired by the looms at HGA’s Convergence conference, he began to study weaving. Watching the fabric form during weaving is fascinating as the patterns and colors combine. Weaving on floor, table and rigid loom, he makes table linens and scarves primarily in cottons and wools.

SATURDAY, 8:30am–3:30pm

Japanese Shibori

Shibori has been practiced in Japan since the 8th century — and in this class, participants will explore this ancient art of stitching, winding, clamping and folding fabrics to create a resist and a totally unique pattern. After working with cotton squares and blue dye to recreate their own traditional Shibori samples, participants will create a one of a kind Shibori scarf. Experienced dyers will enjoy this opportunity to explore a new medium.

Instructor: Rosanna Ludwig • Skill Level: All levels

MATERIALS FEE: $12
Includes fabric and handouts

BRING TO CLASS

  • Old clothes or an apron
  • Kitchen gloves
  • Sharp, pointed craft scissors
  • Seam ripper
  • Craft cutting board
  • Ruler or tape measure

INSTRUCTOR
Rosanna Ludwig has been a fiber artist for over 30 years, working in weaving, surface design, spinning and felting.She has taught nuno felting and dyeing classes — including batik and marbling. Rosanna resides in Northeast Ohio.

Weaving Krokbragd Sheep on an Inkle Loom

Band weaving is a great way to take your weaving on the road.  If you already know how to weave on an inkle, then krokbragd is a great “next step.”  When we think of band weaving, we generally think of guitar or camera straps, for example, woven in striking, colorful, repetitive patterns.  This version of band weaving is loom controlled and allows you to make pictures.  Krokbragd falls between simple plain weave and pick up in complexity.  In this class we will make a flock of sheep standing all in a row.  You will learn how to set up the loom and how to weave a krokbragd motif.

Instructor: Joan Sheridan • Skill Level: All levels
Participants must know how to warp & weave on an inkle loom

MATERIALS FEE: $20
Includes yarn, handouts and weaving aids

BRING TO CLASS

  • Inkle loom
  • Sharp scissors
  • Table clamp (if used to secure your loom while warping and weaving)
  • 60 double heddles premade to fit your loom

PLEASE NOTE: The Ashford Inklette and similar compact inkle looms are not appropriate for this technique.
Schacht Looms, with heddles ready-made, are available for purchase through the instructor at a 10% discount if ordered prior to May 1. Students who do not know how to make double heddles should contact the instructor at joan@heritagespinning.com — it is very important that heddles be made correctly and prior to class.

INSTRUCTOR
Joan Sheridan is weaver, knitter, spinner, fiber explorer and, since 2000, owner of Heritage Spinning and Weaving in Lake Orion, Michigan. Trained as an educator and curriculum developer by the United States Army, Joan is a natural teacher. She volunteers in the textile conservation department at The Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan, where she loves combining her passion for textiles with her fascination with history. She has taught and presented at national and regional conferences, festivals, for guilds and shops, and on tour in Norway.

SUNDAY, 8:30–11:30am

Get Hooked on Tunisian Crochet

Tunisian crochet is a technique using an elongated hook that yields the smooth fabric of knitting with the ease of crochet. In this beginners class, we will learn to make a shawlette.

Instructor: Kay Wirth • Skill Level: Beginner

MATERIALS FEE: None

BRING TO CLASS

  • M crochet hook with a 16-inch cable
  • 600 yards of DK weight yarn

NOTE: A selection of yarns and hooks will be available for purchase in class.

INSTRUCTOR
Kay Wirth is an avid knitter and crocheter from Westfield Center, Ohio. She has been exploring and teaching Tunisian crochet for the past four years at the Black Locust Farm Yarn Shop in Lodi, Ohio.

SUNDAY, 12:30–3:30pm

Colors to Dye For

In this three-hour workshop, participants will learn basics of dyeing with Procion MX fiber reactive dyes on their projects of choice.  While MX dyes do work with animals fibers, this workshop will focus on dyeing plant fibers (cotton, rayon, tencel work best) so bring your own cotton (not mixed cotton/polyester) t-shirts, onesies or other garment to tie-dye. Alternatively, participants may bring skeins or warp chains to “paint.”  We’ll be using primary colors (both warm and cool) so while learning to mix colors, we’ll concoct a myriad of colors.

Instructor: Betsy Bruce • Skill Level: Beginner (age 12 and up)

MATERIALS FEE: $15
Includes handouts

BRING TO CLASS

  • Items to be dyed (washed and still damp)
  • Rubber/latex gloves
  • Plastic bags for taking home wet dyed items (check that bags have no holes)
  • Plastic basin or bucket for transport
  • Roll of paper towels (partial is okay)
  • “Grubby” clothing for wearing when dyeing or a waterproof apron

INSTRUCTOR
A physical educator by vocation and a fiber artist by avocation, Betsy Bruce has been weaving for 30 years and dyeing yarn for nearly 25. Color is one of Betsy’s hallmarks. She is often being inspired by nature. Betsy has facilitated myriad “dye-days” using Procion MX fiber reactive dyes for small groups and guilds over the years. She taught a weaving/garment construction winter term project at Oberlin College for 16 years before recently retiring.

SUNDAY, 8:30am–3:30pm

Creative Rug Hooking with Yarn & Wool Fabric

Learn to hook a rug using wool strips and yarn for beautiful texture. Participants will create a small mat for the table or cricket stool (a small stool kept by the hearth) from two choices of designs: the instructor’s original star or a traditional Cat’s Paw/Hit or Miss (finished size: 10 ½” x 6”). Students will also learn to transfer a pattern to a foundation.

Instructor: Laura Enoch • Skill Level: All levels

MATERIALS FEE: $15
Includes linen foundation, wool strips, commercial yarn and chunky handspun for some of the design

BRING TO CLASS

  • Small sharp scissors
  • Rug hooking frame or 8-10” embroidery hoop
  • Size D crochet hood or rug hook
  • Optional: your own chunky handspun

NOTE: Kits for a Cricket Stool ($45) and handspun yarn will available for purchase for a take-home project

INSTRUCTOR
Laura Enoch had been a rug hooking enthusiast for 15 years. She is a member of Lorain County Hookcrafters, ATHA, and Medina Spinning & Weaving Guild. She has taken textile courses at University of Akron and used many types of fibers and textiles for primitive style rug hooking.

Weaving Options — Warping & Weaving with Ease

Dressing the loom is a huge part of weaving — in fact, it is critical to making the weaving pleasant. When you know how to warp with ease, you can sit back and enjoy the weaving. Imagine fewer broken threads, better selvedges, no more aching back, and less loom waste. This class is for the early, weekend and production weaver. Participants of all levels can learn something new that can make a world of difference to their weaving. Joan will share “weaving hacks” that can make your warping, weaving, and finishing better and faster. Class will be taught lecture style, with some hands-on work on the warping mill, warping board, trapeze and loom.

Instructor: Joan Sheridan • Skill Level: Some multi-shaft weaving experience helpful

MATERIALS FEE: $20
Includes handouts

BRING TO CLASS

  • Paper/notebook for notes

INSTRUCTOR
Joan Sheridan is weaver, knitter, spinner, fiber explorer and, since 2000, owner of Heritage Spinning and Weaving in Lake Orion, Michigan. Trained as an educator and curriculum developer by the United States Army, Joan is a natural teacher. She volunteers in the textile conservation department at The Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan, where she loves combining her passion for textiles with her fascination with history. She has taught and presented at national and regional conferences, festivals, for guilds and shops, and on tour in Norway.

Spinning Luxury — Cashmere, Camel & More

Goats and camelids produce some delightful fibers for hand spinners. This workshop is a survey class in which we will spin goat fibers (mohair, cashmere, and pygora) and camelids fibers (Huacaya, alpaca, Suri alpaca, llama and camel). Some of these fibers are strong and shiny, some are soft and warm — but all are luxurious! Participants will explore different strategies for preparing and spinning luxury fibers, and their best uses.

Instructor: Amy Tyler • Skill Level: Intermediate spinners

MATERIALS FEE: $25
Includes notebook with handouts, fiber for spinning, samples for examination

BRING TO CLASS

  • Spinning wheel in good working order
  • Three bobbins
  • Lazy kate

INSTRUCTOR
Amy was first a dancer, then a neuroscientist and professor. In 2004 she left the academic world behind to pursue fiber arts full time. Since then she had taught spinning and knitting workshops at venues across the country and is known for her animated and engaging teaching style. Her fiber work is informed by her art and science background; she has a keen understanding of learning movement skills, composition, pattern recognition, and systematic exploration. The result is her focus on spinning and knitting technique, texture, three-dimensional structure, and knit designs that exploit handspinning techniques. Amy is the author of Spin-Off magazine’s column, “Ask a Spinning Teacher”. You can find additional articles by Amy in Spin-Off and Ply Magazine

WANT TO TEACH?

We are always looking for teachers and suggestions for workshops. Click here to download our proposal form, and email to the completed form to info@greatlakesfibershow.com. We'll accept workshop proposals for the 2019 Great Lakes Fiber Show from June 1 through August 30, 2018.

INSTRUCTORS

COLLEEN BOYD

Colleen Boyd began her journey as a fiber artist 32 years ago.  A spinner, dyer, and weaver, she is now an Angora rabbit breeder and has been working on colors in the Giant Angora breed category.  She teaches regularly at fiber festivals all over Michigan.

BETSY BRUCE

A physical educator by vocation and a fiber artist by avocation, Betsy Bruce has been weaving for 30 years and dyeing yarn for nearly 25.  Color is one of Betsy’s hallmarks.  She is often being inspired by nature.  Betsy has facilitated myriad “dye-days” using Procion MX fiber reactive dyes for small groups and guilds over the years.  She taught a weaving/garment construction winter term project at Oberlin College for 16 years before recently retiring.

LAURA ENOCH

Laura Enoch had been a rug hooking enthusiast for 15 years.  She is a member of Lorain County Hookcrafters, ATHA, and Medina Spinning & Weaving Guild.  She has taken textile courses at University of Akron and used many types of fibers and textiles for primitive style rug hooking.

BONNIE HARDEN

Bonnie is an avid knitter who has been teaching classes at The Artful Yarn, in Chagrin Falls, Ohio for many years.

ROSANNA LUDWIG

Rosanna Ludwig has been a fiber artist for over 30 years, working in weaving, surface design, spinning and felting.She has taught nuno felting and dyeing classes — including batik and marbling. Rosanna resides in Northeast Ohio.

STEPHEN PAGE

Stephen Page has been weaving for the last ten years. After being inspired by the looms at HGA’s Convergence conference, he began to study weaving, fascinated by watching the fabric form as the patterns and colors combine. Weaving on floor, table and rigid loom, Stephen makes table linens and scarves primarily in cottons and wools.

JOAN SHERIDAN

Joan Sheridan is weaver, knitter, spinner, fiber explorer — and since 2000, owner of Heritage Spinning and Weaving in Lake Orion, Michigan. Trained as an educator and curriculum developer by the United States Army, Joan is a natural teacher. She volunteers in the textile conservation department at The Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan, where she loves combining her passion for textiles with her fascination with history. Joan has taught and presented at national and regional conferences, festivals, for guilds and shops, and on tour in Norway.

GINA TALANDIS

Gina began weaving over 20 years ago and has taken up spinning in the past year. She started needle felting for fun about three years ago.

AMY TYLER

Amy was first a dancer, then a neuroscientist and professor. In 2004 she left the academic world behind to pursue fiber arts full time. Since then, she had taught spinning and knitting workshops at venues across the country and is known for her animated and engaging teaching style. Amy’s fiber work is informed by her art and science background; she has a keen understanding of learning movement skills, composition, pattern recognition, and systematic exploration. The result is her focus on spinning and knitting technique, texture, three-dimensional structure, and knit designs that exploit handspinning techniques. Amy is the author of Spin-Off magazine’s column. “Ask a Spinning Teacher”.  You can find additional articles by Amy in Spin-Off and Ply Magazine.

KAY WIRTH

Kay Wirth is an avid knitter and crocheter from Westfield Center, Ohio. She has been exploring and teaching Tunisian crochet for the past four years at the Black Locust Farm Yarn Shop in Lodi, Ohio.